How to avoid the principle mistakes that blight your sales stats

While some industries are subject to change after change, this isn’t necessarily the same when it comes to sales. The principles remain the same and while technology might play its part from time to time, if you were to compare top salespeople from decades ago to ones in the modern-day, you would probably find a lot of similarities.

At the same time, you may also find a lot of mistakes. The nature of sales means that it is very easy for mistakes to creep into your work and if you are struggling to get your numbers up, take a look at the following to see if you are falling into some of the most common traps.

Mistake #1 – There’s no personalization

If we rolled back the clock a few years, this wouldn’t really have been a mistake – at least in larger businesses. After all, personalization was only really possible in smaller businesses who had the time to get to know their clients, and ultimately use this to their advantage.

Well, technology has of course changed this. One only has to look at the rise of account based selling to see this in full-detail, and how companies really can target individuals much more easily nowadays.

Mistake #2 – You just focus on the offer

A lot of people mistake sales with throwing as many offers into the face of a consumer as possible. In truth, it’s not like this in the slightest. Sure, some consumers are going to be completely game for that 20% offer, but the bulk of your sales won’t arrive because of this.

Instead, most will come because you are solving a customer’s problem. You need to show how your product and service will resolve a particular issue, and go from there. After you have demonstrated this, you then might tip them over the edge with price.

Mistake #3 – You take too long to close

There is certainly an art of closing, but far too many people don’t time this part of the sales process properly.

Far too many people instead let it draw out much longer than is ever needed. Not only does this mean that time is wasted, but it can actually turn off a buyer who is just tired of hearing more information about the chosen product or service.

What’s the best way around this? Ask the client. Ask if they have heard enough, and from then on you can choose whether to try and close, or continue your pitch.

Mistake #4 – You ignore people who could influence the decision

This is something of an old-hat mistake. Traditionally, salesmen were taught to convince the decision-maker to buy a product – but this isn’t necessarily the best strategy nowadays.

Sure, if you get them on your side you are a long way there, but also think about the influencers. Start to realize that other people can influence the decision-maker, and try to target them through your pitch.

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